PDA

View Full Version : Review "Jiraiya" Is More Than Dead



ornis
December 16, 2007, 02:08 AM
How's it going? Seems I shouldn't go reclusive... too much just happened for me to die down. But I decided to channel most of my thoughts on the latest chapter here because I won't be around for a while (finals and vacation). Thanks to HisshouBuraiKen,
Kylara, MangaHelpers, and MangaShare. I have reviewed the chapter with their help, though I won't accompany my thoughts with any images of it. Feel free to critique.

[hr]

Jiraiya now appears as a very defining character for the manga as a whole.

Take in how Jiraiya's first novel offers a main character whose name was given to Naruto.

Take in how Jiraiya believes the shinobi is defined by endurance and perseverance, it is a warrior that never gives up.

Take in how Jiraiya accepts Naruto's own philosophy as his own and pushes himself back to life by what seems to be will alone.

Reflect on Jiraiya's humbling admittance of his failures though he still struggles to give one of his handy toads a purpose to accomplish on Jiraiya's behalf. I'm sure Kabuto remembers how strong Naruto's will can be even without the full mastery of his chakra. And wouldn't the mirror of that thought present Jiraiya, stabbed with five, chakra-scrambling rods and still able to shroud a finger tip in a focus of chakra?

Know that both Naruto and Jiraiya are incredibly resourceful... and if foreshadowing may have it, as Jiraiya just feels indomitable at the brink of death, so too may Naruto... but the better favor must rest in Naruto's hands.

In fact, let the this point linger that Jiraiya essentially believes Naruto carries the duty to correct his shinobi world as the toad-summoning, quite gallant, and even on one jutsu, very formidable Naruto.... who I believe is presented to us as the reincarnation of the Gallant Jiraiya. A part of Jiraiya was in his own tale of Naruto. Naruto is really in that tale redefining Jiraiya as we speak... in Kishimoto's own tale of Jiraiya.

The brilliance of the last few arcs may not be in the immediate plot that feels so obvious, but how that distracts from the meaning of battles that nearly rain out of the book... well take the coats, the barriers, the camouflage.... there is still something mysterious and attractive in the cloak that forms out of those three themes, from a very straight-up plot that seemed to have no depth... it was quite the storm I'm betting it was supposed to be. So, where's the sun? Even through all of the diversions, Naruto is still at the heart in a very interesting rhyme of things... in Naruto's tale of Jiraiya.

Oh yeah, he probably still has a snake to "beat" after all ;)

What a smooth and incredible play on reinvention! This is an iconic moment in the entire story that literally shows the underneath of the underneath.

Now, to think that Naruto seemed dead for a moment....

Naruto Is More Than Alive.

lordHokage
December 16, 2007, 08:00 AM
What a smooth and incredible play on reinvention! This is an iconic moment in the entire story that literally shows the underneath of the underneath.

Now, to think that Naruto seemed dead for a moment....

Naruto Is More Than Alive.

Bravo, bravo ornis. :occa :kkthumbs :wtf


I wish you all the best in your endeavors. :)

Konkun
December 16, 2007, 11:05 AM
Will Naruto take up the role of hermit just as Shikimaru picked up smoking in avenging the death of Asuma? It's been shown that Naruto has the embodiment of Jiraiya in his youth -the wreckless, loud mouth and troublesome student (perverted too). At the same time through the eyes of Kakashi, Naruto takes after his dad. At this point of the story, the Naruto is playing the dual roles, the Legendary 4th Hokage heritage and the Gallant Jiraiya. Both of which Naruto will not have problems to fill. However, Naruto has much to learn; his tale is only half written.

kiddo7
December 17, 2007, 03:11 AM
reading your review is very inspiring. First of I love the artistic feel you gave it (especially the ending seemed almost like poetry) Second while lurking and reading many a discussion on the forums, I got the impression that many of us are just reading Naruto because it used to be great but now have only bad things to say about it. I on the other hand have actually enjoyed many (though not all) of the recent chapters and really still like the series, and reading all those negative comments really drains me after a while.
So reading a review with an all around positive tone and highlighting all the good parts of a chapter really makes my day.
Thank you once again.

ornis
December 19, 2007, 10:01 PM
Will Naruto take up the role of hermit just as Shikimaru picked up smoking in avenging the death of Asuma? It's been shown that Naruto has the embodiment of Jiraiya in his youth -the wreckless, loud mouth and troublesome student (perverted too). At the same time through the eyes of Kakashi, Naruto takes after his dad. At this point of the story, the Naruto is playing the dual roles, the Legendary 4th Hokage heritage and the Gallant Jiraiya. Both of which Naruto will not have problems to fill. However, Naruto has much to learn; his tale is only half written.

You know, I was thinking, maybe Naruto will come to fulfill his own role separate from Jiraiya or Minato.

Well---isn't it nice to note Jiraiya being consoled by Minato who comes up in Jiraiya's reminiscence of his failures? But herein is where Minato encourages Jiraiya and believes that in Jiraiya lies one of the strongest shinobi Minato has ever known. Where are the comparisons here? Where is the juggle of the shinobi, Jiraiya, with another, with the latter's legend being claimed as possible to be bestowed upon and furthered by Jiraiya?

Minato talks about a character that comes to grow out of Jiraiya himself. It's as if while Naruto is claimed to represent his father's potential, his father still admired Jiraiya's separate identity. So Naruto must find heart in him, no matter who Naruto seems to resemble. Jiraiya was his own person and so is Naruto. And as Minato never compared Jiraiya to Minato or any other shinobi, he humbly claims Jiraiya to be one of the greatest shinobi Minato's ever encountered... rather than a shinobi limited to a comparison between a Hokage or another Sannin. There’s no scaling based on an established persona or likeness in rank/class, not even to peers or similar circumstance. Plus, a telescope in Naruto's hands akin to a cigarette in Shika's would make the theme feel trite to me.

Thankfully, Jiraiya’s just a great shinobi for his own spirit. In tandem, though Naruto surely seems to surpass his father by standing out in accomplishments exceeding the Fourth’s standards, Naruto feels to be beyond comparison to his father, but Kakashi seemingly fails to give Naruto his respective credit without finding a model to weigh Naruto's worth against. Though it only seems so.

Here's a study. What Kakashi doesn’t immediately see in Kakashi Gaiden is how he can't save himself and defeat his complex about the image of his father. He must not reduce himself to a service that has to rectify his father's actions. Being lost in trying to defend who Kakashi is in light of his Father shows that Kakashi can't be himself without recognizing how frustrating and futile he becomes when he seeks to end a mission so hastily and stubbornly that he nearly loses not only objective but his own life. Yes, Kakashi works best by understanding others, from figuring out Zabuza to training Naurto on the premise of what he can do but do better: more than form shadow clones but learn in the process. Even so, when he tries to grasp another person's character, Kakashi can't substitute his familial mindset, to secure his team and friends, with a dash of his old view.

It just doesn't work to limit other people in the same way he limited himself... how can a person be defined by another person’s identity? The life anyone may live may be set out to meet another person's ways or nindo in some set of inheritance… a person may thrive to find a separate style, but who is that person if the individual can’t be without living up to or repairing a name? Does it have to be a name? What if there’s a spirit admired... is this spirit, this character… is it the exception? "To never give in" is different from "to finish his jutsu"… though that's in scope of belonging... of an attachment to an idea, "that to be renowned, one must reach or superceed what's renowned"....

But where Naruto surpasses the Fourth may not be in the fame but in the utter survivability, for as a jutsu is mastered faster, the chance to change the battlefield quicker in his favor affords him the chance to "never give in" far more aptly.

Naruto has much to learn; yeah, you're right about that... how he learns will make him "Naruto", as it always has. No, it was never about Gallant Jiraiya renewed... it was about the spirit of that sage under a different name, that's more recognizable as Jiraiya-esque in all of Naruto's nuances, form the toad-summoning to the perversion.

I have to summarize that Jiraiya just can't be Naruto. Naruto is his own person. And the static comparisons between others really don't do him justice ... the only fitting conclusion is that if Jiraiya is in Naruto, it is this character that was never bodily bound to begin with... but it didn't fail to realize how full of life it could be... even in what appeared to be a legendary one. "Jiraiya" is in spirit, perhaps waiting to materialize in someone who can undeniably define him... perhaps growing without the moniker to be essentially shinobi in Naruto.