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PossesedNinja
January 21, 2009, 04:00 PM
First off, I did try to search for this topic, but I did not find it on the search results (I might just be blind).

Second, I know this is a touchy subject, and have no objection to this being closed / deleted.

Third, This is mainly for a senior project research paper-thing, and I decided to research the scanlation-subculture, how that effects intellectual property, copyright, and how such a thing came to be.

So anyway, I don't really expect all my questions to be answered, and yes I will indeed credit your forum username in my paper, if you are wondering.

Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
How did you learn about scanlations?
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Do you buy the manga?
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?

Again, if the mods/admins decide this is too touchy, go ahead and close it. I don't expect any one person to answer all of them, any input would be much appreciated, as the paper seeks to analyze the arguments of both sides.

Thank you for your time,
PN

krid77
January 21, 2009, 06:23 PM
Why do you read scanlations?
Because the chapters/volumes I read aren't released yet in my country, because the books are awfully expensive if you read about 10 different series a month...


How did you learn about scanlations?
I was given scanlated manga when I didn't have the Internet yet xD


Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Both.
Editors oftenly search for the most scanlated mangas/most popular titles on the Internet.
But on the other hand if you don't buy manga and don't erase them from your hard drive, then it hurts the industry.
But it is less hurting than animated contents.


Do you buy the manga?
Yes. About...4-5 volumes a month


Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
In France or Asian countries: definitely not.
French people is the 2nd manga industry after Japan, manga was already popular in the 90s. Same thing in other Asian countries.
But scanlation sure contributes to promote manga when you see people from Eastern Europe, Africa, South America,...etc reading it.

I hope I answered well to your questions =)

alpvonkri
January 21, 2009, 07:17 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
How did you learn about scanlations?
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Do you buy the manga?
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?1. I read scanlations because I'm not Japanese, and sometimes It's difficult to obtain Japanese manga directly from Japan.
2. I learned about scanlations when I was looking for the manga.
3. Legally it's almost sure that it hurts the industry because they don't pay, but it also promotes the manga culture and also gives the authors and series popularity and more money by some other indirect way.
4. True at certain point, because only Japanese speakers/readers may understand dialogs, but people who can't speak/read Japanese may also like to watch it even if they don't understand what they say.

PossesedNinja
January 21, 2009, 07:53 PM
Thank you both, Krid77 (yes it did answer my questions), and alpvonkri.

Please keep them coming, the more opinions the better :D.

TitaniumChloride
January 22, 2009, 01:14 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
It's faster, usually consistent (weekly releases as opposed to undetermined amount of months before an official translated volume), it can be more accurate (because the translations can be corrected more easily) and because it's usually in a digital format, I don't have to lug around books all the time (not that I don't like books; this is just it easier for travel).

How did you learn about scanlations?
Through a friend I think. Or maybe just googling a series I was looking for. (Can't remember sorry)

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
It does hurt the industry in terms of direct profit from volume sales, but I think that it's also a great promotion scheme. I wouldn't have even considered most of the manga I'm reading now if they weren't scanlated, let alone buy them. If it has a weekly release, that's a bonus because it keeps my interest in the manga going until I actually buy them. I think it helps merchandise sales in a way too...

Do you buy the manga?
When I can, and only the original Japanese volumes. I haven't bought all the ones I've read, but I'm working on it.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Yes, I believe so. With all the issues involved in localization and publication, not to mention the stigma usually associating comics to kids, manga wouldn't have reached out to it's currently huge fanbase (in terms of both age and location) if it wasn't scanlated.

roma
January 22, 2009, 10:23 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
How did you learn about scanlations?
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Do you buy the manga?
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?


1]Well, I read scanlations because it's faster. If I wait for the volume to be released (geographical issue) it'll probably take months at the very least. As for accuracy, there are different version of scans and it's good to read different versions.

2]I've known quite a number of people who were so into manga and everyday they're spending some of their time reading the latest chapters on the net. They gave me some infos on where to look for scans. :p

3] Scanlations might hurt the industry as there are those who would just prefer to read online or download the scans than buying. But there are pros, too. Because of scans, the public's awareness of these mangas increased instead of just a specific geographical location. And those who really love mangas will buy them even if you have scans everywhere.

4]For mangas that I truly follow, I do buy manga volumes. Unfortunately, I don't know where to buy the comic issues released every week. Finding copies in the local bookstore here is rare. I have to look for copies online and even then shipping is a problem. Still, I wanna have a complete collection of the mangas I like. :D

5]Yep, I think so. Having scans increase the fan base of mangas throughout. I'm not even from Japan but I just love reading mangas and scanlations solve the problem of waiting. Waiting for issues for quite a long time results in loss of interest of the readers. So until a volume is released, scans it is! :D

Nantalith
March 22, 2009, 06:08 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?

I don't like to wait and the translations are often better. Fans seem to capture the characters better than official translators. Fans also translate background stuff.

How did you learn about scanlations?

Looking for information on 'what happens next'.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?

I'm inclined to say no, it is not hurting the industry. Not having a monthly/weekly magazine to pick up and check titles means having to buy expensive books. I read the scans and if I like it, I buy the manga; it's better than not buying anything at all.

Do you buy the manga?

Yes - having the books is better.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?

Yes. It is difficult enough to get comics in my country, let alone manga. It is changing though.

Revilenigma
April 10, 2009, 02:14 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
A: They don't sell any where I live, it's faster and some of my favorite series haven't or won't be published
How did you learn about scanlations?
A: Googling: download free manga
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
A: promoting cause if it weren't for scanlations most of us would have never discovered manga
Do you buy the manga?
A: I would if they sold it.
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
A: yes

ittaak
April 10, 2009, 08:18 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
I read scanlations for different reasons depending on the series. I read scans of One Piece because it much faster than the Viz releases. I read scanlations of Bleach to see how horrible it still is and because it only takes 1 minute to read a chapter. I also read them for series that aren't licensed or that will probably never get licensed.

How did you learn about scanlations?
I learned about scanlations after looking up Naruto on the internet after buying all six available volumes of Naruto at the time from Borders.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
It is probably doing both. It hurts it obviously because some people probably would buy more manga if they didn't have easy access to scanlations but at the same time its easy access brings in people who wouldn't have found out about manga in the first place. All of them might not buy manga but it helps to expand the audience who reads it. A larger audience means a larger amount of people will possibly buy manga.

For me, scanlations have saved me a lot money, in that I have been able to read ahead and see that I no longer like series that I used to buy. I used to buy Naruto and Bleach at the drop of the hat, but not only do I think both series are bad, but I don't like them anymore.
Series I wouldn't have found out about if not for scans like Pluto and 20th Century Boys, I plan to collect because I think they are great series. My rule for manga is that if I ever want to reread the series I will buy it, so if I ever get the urge to reread Naruto up to the time skip or Bleach up to end of the Soul Society arc, I will buy them.

Do you buy the manga?
Yes.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
I would like to answer, but I don't know because the way I was introduced really goes all the way back to Sailor Moon. When I was a child i really liked anime like Sailor Moon, Inuyasha, and Yu Yu Hakusho before I even knew they were anime. Lokking them up online is what brought me information about Naruto in the first place. I read that he was a ninja living in a ninja village and had a rival and that's all I knew about it until years later. So when I ended in a bookstore and saw Naruto the shelves I read it and bought it. So scanlations weren't in the picture then for me.

Fugitive
April 13, 2009, 04:23 PM
1. Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
2. How did you learn about scanlations?
3. Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
4. Do you buy the manga?
5. Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?1. It's free.
2. I found out that comics were online available for download. Through that I eventually found manga. Started reading it online, then eventually started downloading it.
3. Both. Hurts the industry when people don't buy the manga and only pirate the scanlations. Helps in the sense that it is exposing new titles to people who would possibly purchase the manga.
4. Nope.
5. Possible, I can see that being the case, but I'm not sure or care.

Gecko Moria
April 15, 2009, 04:07 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
It's free and because it's the most up-to-date. And it's also the most convenient for me because I spend a lot of time on the computer.

How did you learn about scanlations?
I just found it when I was looking for the latest chapter of a certain manga.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Promoting. Not everyone can afford to buy the books but more people go on the internet, that way more people can read it. And, of course, it inspires great communities like this one. I definitely call that promoting if nothing else.

Do you buy the manga?
Sometimes. I have about 5-6 books that I own. I usually borrow form the library though.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Of course, I wouldn't be so into manga if I could only get them when I visit the library or buy them.

bax
April 17, 2009, 01:55 AM
Second, I know this is a touchy subject, and have no objection to this being closed / deleted.

Eh.. I don't see it like that at all. If anything else, it qualifies as opinion gathering.


Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?Personally, for its easy access and material selection process, nothing else. I used to buy native translated volumes before (see Q4 for more elaborate reasons), but honestly, I wouldn't even know all the manga I'm reading.

Internet is an easy method to get these manga.


How did you learn about scanlations?Back during the Dragon Ball era. Found it while browsing the internet looking for Dragon Ball stuffs >.> Can't remember the exact time, but around 6 or 7 years ago I think.. Can't remember :s


Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?Both.

It would be a lie if it doesn't hurt the industry. It hurts badly even, probably. Companies lost their potential sales to an impossible to control market (internet).

But on the other hand, it's not really promoting per se, but it does create an awareness and a subculture of its own. By doing that, it creates a massive awareness or even a craze, in which people call it "promoting". Not really your text book promoting by regular definition, but I guess you can say that.

In turn, companies gain benefit from this. Not really the idealistic outcome for them, but probably an acceptable outcome derived from an uncontrollable market (yet).


Do you buy the manga?Always. Although it's becoming more expensive nowadays, but I still buy every single volume of all the manga I read (Japanese volumes). Although, it's the money factor usually play its part. I will buy the volumes, but when only my money allows me to do so. Otherwise, I'll hold the purchase until my monetary allows me to.

Corresponding to Q1, yes, I used to buy locally published volumes, but since it's hard to get titles here and plus with miserable translations, I learned Japanese. I also had to learn Japanese for my previous work. So nowadays, I just import the Japanese volumes either through custom order at my bookstore pr directly from sites like bk1.

Monthly purchase can be from 3 to more than a dozen books, depending on money.


Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?I believe that statement is half true. Scanlations or rather the internet made the spread easier to reach. It's a global thing. I don't need to explain why and how, since it's just obvious.

The other half would be the actual effort by the official license holders.

Xadyu
April 25, 2009, 11:31 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
Because it's quicker to read new series, I'm not someone with a lot of patience, especially not when I see something I like. And I don't want to wait for months/years for it to get licensed and published in a language I can read. It may take too long, or it can even never happen.

Scanlations are the perfect way to ease my pain, and, the fact that I can check series out before I buy them is a big plus. Not every bookstore let's you read parts of a certain book in the store. You need to buy it before checking it out, and you can't return them in every store, and that's waste of money, if you don't like the series.



How did you learn about scanlations?

I can't really remember that, but it was by accident, probably through a search engine like Google or something.



Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?

Scanlations are hurting AND promoting the manga industry.

Why? Scanlations let you check out series for free, but if you like it, you'll buy it, just for the fun of it, just for having it and of course for the extras, for substance you can actually touch and make you feel good (lol).

But on the other hand, there are people who read something, and well, that's it, they'll never buy manga in they're lives, if they read it already, or something in that way.



Do you buy the manga?

Yes.



Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Manga isn't even close to being as big as in Japan, and Scanlations isn't going to change this.

Anime's promote the manga more then scanlations do, they are the source to make manga big in other countries besides Japan. If I visit forums from my country, 99% doesn't even know what Scanlations are/or don't read them. The other 1% do just read once in a while.

It doesn't support them in buying manga etc tho'. And that's the key into making manga big. SALES! If people would buy more, companies would license more, would promote more, and would do actually better jobs at is in publishing it.

stelok
May 28, 2009, 07:36 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
It is because they are free.

How did you learn about scanlations?
Through the internet.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
It is hurting and promoting the industry. Good news: It may lead legions of new readers to buy manga. Bad news: people would rather read manga for free than buy them.

Do you buy the manga?
Yes, a few manga.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Probably not.

Sloggett
May 28, 2009, 10:28 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Because I enjoy finding out/reading different manga series that may never see the light of day in my own country.

How did you learn about scanlations?
While looking for information about current series I was reading/buying I found many links and websites with scans.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
I think it's doing both. For series like naruto which gets scanned weekly it has to hurt as many fans won't buy the series now. Although lesser known series it generates interest and as soon as volumes become available fans will go out of their way to buy what they already know about.

Do you buy the manga?
Yes.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Lesser known manga wouldn't survive.

Binky
May 28, 2009, 07:49 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
Speed and accuracy.

How did you learn about scanlations?
I was a purely anime viewer at first, and from joining some online communities learned that scanlations were to Manga what fansubs were to anime. Then I happened to find myself in a group.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
I'm not in a position to speak with any assurance with regards to global trends and so on, but I can say, that amongst those friends I know who follow Manga, none would have spent a thing were it not for being introduced to the form through scanlations.

Do you buy the manga?
Yes. I do not, admittedly, own every series I have ever read scanlations of, but I am an active buyer.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Scanlations have raised the profile of Manga in general, yes.

L0ki
July 14, 2009, 03:14 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
Lack of monetary compensation for the service.

How did you learn about scanlations?
By chance on the interwebz.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
It's hard to say if the number of people exposed to new manga, converting them in potential customers, exceeds the number of cheap bastards like me who wouldn't spend a cent on manga.

Do you buy the manga?
Read the previous answer.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Probably not.

Mushashi
November 28, 2009, 04:54 AM
of course it helps the industry, most poeple buy the manga aswell, i buy volumes ive spent 100 dollars a week for the last 3 years buying volumes, not much is really coverd in english currently sure things are growing and i much prefer a book in my hands, but half the series i read a find out about from them being popular scanlations that i would never of even picked off the shelf

stelok
January 07, 2010, 05:56 PM
I can't read Japanese and many manga are still unlicensed.

Newkerzy
January 08, 2010, 01:18 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
faster & up-to-date

How did you learn about scanlations?
I was looking around youtube & stumbled upon some Naruto manga chapters. & I also checked out some fanarts (again, on youtube), some of them mentioned deviantart. Then while looking around for some fanarts, a deviant mentioned a Naruto fan group then that fan group mentioned about scanlations & I found Onemanga.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Both, it helps promote manga but at the same hurts the industry.

Do you buy the manga?
Only for mangas that haven't been scanlated or has been dropped by scanlation groups. I'm also planning to buy Naruto vol.47 soon since it's just way too epic to pass up.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Yep.

BTW, someone mentioned that Jump editors also checks out scanlated manga on the net. Now, if they did that they should've been smart enough to keep Double Arts.... or,at the very least have American Jump to publish it & continue it. (I mean, hello Double Arts is more popular with international fans true, but that's a big chance to raise a brand new cash-cow like Naruto)

R4n
January 08, 2010, 11:02 AM
I am curious about your opinion as well, possessedNinja, :tem




How did you learn about scanlations?


My friend introduced me to it.



Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?


Note that whenever i said "official release", i am referring to the official translated mangas that are published in countries other than japan.


Main Reason: Because it is faster than official release. With scanlation i am able to keep up with the weekly and monthly manga release just a few days later than the Japanese release in japan.
Secondary Reason: The manga are not published (yet) in my country. Or it won't even be published at all.

I don't really think scanlation is more accurate than official release. It is objective. Sometimes the quality of the image of the official volumes are much better than the scans. The lines are crisper, cleaner, etc. This can't be helped because most scans i read are speed scans. ;)



Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?


Both. (this is from my observation :p)
-It depends on the people who read scans. Sometimes people choose to read scans because it is free, and it hinder them from buying the volumes.
-In some places, impudent jerks are selling the free scanlations for profits. :mad (It is a mistake to categorize these kind of people with the scanlators.). I feel that this hurt the industry, because there's always some ignorant people who buy them instead of the superior offical volumes :mad


- on the other hand, some people see the scanlation as a "tester" before actually buying the official volume. This actually (greatly) promote the manga, series, or author.
- because of scanlation, many obscure titles are introduced to the masses, and BECOME POPULAR wayyy before the official volumes are released. Thus, when the official volumes are published, the existing fans buy the volumes. In this case, scanlations serve as the free publicity for the official publisher.




Do you buy the manga?


For mangas i like, yes of course.
i am a manga collector afterall. Eventhough i already read them in scanlations, i always prefer the tangible form.
Besides, reading scanlations strain the eyes and crowd the harddisk. Sometimes the quality of the scans are inferior to the official releases.
There are bonus materials in the official volumes that are not available in scans.

Akiyama
January 08, 2010, 11:16 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
-It's the only way to read my favorite manga ~ Liar Game. The scans able us to read stuff that might never be published in your own country. Depending on where you live, the only way to read manga is through the internet with scans.

How did you learn about scanlations?
-Well I first knew about manga in 2003 when the American Shonen Jump was published. With anime on tv like Bleach and Naruto I wanted to know more about the history of manga and discovered the scanlation world.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
-Yes, it's hurting the industry. Most people know will say "Why should I buy when I can get it for free." IMO, It doesn't affect Japan's publishers but foreign countries.

Do you buy the manga?
-Yes, you can see mine in the Your manga collection (with pictures!) thread. I like to buy stuff that doesn't get scaned and series that I like. Pluto, 20th Century Boys, REAL, Vagabond is a must even though scans are out.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
-Yes, for one thing MH wouldn't even exist today is scans weren't available. Scans are used to cross language barriers and spread the joy of manga all over the world. Nothing wrong with that.

Newkerzy
January 08, 2010, 11:33 AM
even before internet and scanlations come to existence. -> it started in the 80s and 90s
I don't know about other countries.

Yeah, but the little kiddies here don't know that there ARE scanlations, so that's a good thing:amuse

R4n
January 08, 2010, 12:21 PM
Yeah, but the little kiddies here don't know that there ARE scanlations, so that's a good thing:amuse

off topic: lol ya... there's a lot of "dangerous mangas for kids" out in the net if you are not careful... >___>;;;

I think they should understand the concept of scanlations, though. There's plenty of pirated mangas out there. Many people justify buying those stuff because they don't understand that it comes from the hardwork of the scanlators :mad

LilaChan
January 11, 2010, 11:42 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
How did you learn about scanlations?
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Do you buy the manga?
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?


Scanlations are obviously faster, it's also easier to obtain for a lazy person like me who only stays at home. Some rarer manga never see light overseas too, it's a great way of finding niche stuff. Some manga are out of print and probably fairly impossible to find physically.

I cannot remember. I think I first started reading scanlations back at 2004. Most likely I just stubbled across it with googling.

Scanlation probably hurts mainstream manga sales, such as Naruto/Bleach/FMA. Since most of their audience are casual fans, they are less likely to spend a fortune to collect the manga. But for lesser mainstream series, it does promote the manga. Also niche manga audience are obessive fans who are more likely to spend more on their hobby.

I do find it interesting that Kitchen Princess did so well with its american release. I think partially due to ANN's positive review and also it is not fully scanlated. But you also get manga like Rosario+Vampire selling really well compared to Japan, but is fully scanlated.

Also, nowadays it is much easy to obtain scanlations compared to when I started. With sites like onemanga/mangaviewer hitting the first page when ever you search for a series, it's just going to get more people expecting manga to be free. Maybe back in the days, where manga need to be downloaded from mIRC, scanlation probablly did more good then bad (to allow less known manga to gain a fanbase). Now, a potential fan can just google and expect manga for free. But without the scanlations from the start, there would have been no manga fans.

I used to buy more manga like 2 years ago, before yesasia pricing their chinese edition manga like three times the original price. Back then I guess I buy about 70 volumes a year, now I buy about 20 a year. I do buy less manga, but I've been buying more merchandises/artbook/others. Buying the manga now is more about collecting it and leave it on my shelf to dust. I tend to buy lesser known manga, since famous ones already have a large a fanbase.

In Hong Kong or Asian countries in general, manga are already very popular over there. Mangas are released one or two months (with varying quality) after the Japanese release. Also, even without scanlation, there's manga renting store which doesn't that much good to the industry anyway. So scanlations seem to have little influence over there (and alot of the scanlations are printed and sold).

In the UK (and probably US) probably have a larger effect. In my little anime club in school, there's more manga/anime fans in the lower years then the higher years. In my year (13), there's only 3 of us. Year 8 have like about 8. Most likely due to them using the internet much younger, and finding out most of anime/manga on the internet. Somehow, it makes me cries that it's so easy to get mangas nowadays. These kids never knew back then manga scanlation releases takes much longer (just like fansubs) and much harder to obtain too.


I think they should understand the concept of scanlations, though. There's plenty of pirated mangas out there. Many people justify buying those stuff because they don't understand that it comes from the hardwork of the scanlators

I'm quite pissed about that too. Although I've only seen it in Hong Kong myself (UK is pretty free from pirate copy stuff). I personally only edited about 2-3 chapters of manga , and I know the hardwork that goes to scanlating (I gave up after 3 months meh). Also, don't forget the hardwork of the mangaka too, drawing manga takes ALOT of work.

Dive
January 16, 2010, 05:00 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?

I read scans when the manga isn't available in my country. Very seldom do I read them when they're licensed in America (usually when there's a giant cliffhanger that my anticipation needs to be subdued, haha).


How did you learn about scanlations?

"Click here to download the manga!"


Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?

Both. I know there's a few series out there that I've read and determined that I don't want to buy it when licensed, but that holds true for the vice versa.


Do you buy the manga?

Only if the series is shelf worthy to me. If not, I'll see if it's available at a local library. I never sit in a bookstore and read in front of the shelves.


Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?

Not really. Things can get big outside of a country without the aid of free device; word of mouth is usually the biggest form of promotion.

Kaiten
September 20, 2010, 01:25 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?

Mostly because of how slow it can be for new chapters/tankobon to be released outside of Japan. Especially for series I don't love, it's annoying to have to wait three months for an old volume.

How did you learn about scanlations?

When the anime of Inuyasha ended I wanted to know what happened next. Being a noob I started reading the VIZ releases of the manga. Not paying for, but sitting in Barnes and Nobles and reading (take that publishers). At the time the released manga hadn't caught up with the anime, let alone Japan, so I googled and found my way to Freelance Manga and Inuyasha scanlations :)

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?

Promoting. I would never have heard of Freesia, Kimi ni Todoke, or Nurarihyon no Mago without scanlations. Now I buy the books of one, will buy for another, and would for the third if it were licensed.

Do you buy the manga?

Yes. I mostly buy series that aren't scanlated but will buy favorites to read again.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?

No. I don't know if people would even have heard of manga. The online community has done much of the grunt work for the industry. And continues to do so.

Drmke
September 20, 2010, 11:48 AM
-Why do you read scanlations?
Because several series I love to read have yet to be released in English and probably never will. Also, other series I enjoy reading are released extremely slow and while I'll still buy them when they are available I don't like waiting forever for a volume to come out.

-How did you learn about scanlations?
I got bored one day rereading all my manga I owned and since I knew you could find anime online, I thought what the hell I'll give it a try. And bam there was the mother load.

-Do you think its hurting, promoting, etc. the industry?
Promoting. I know several people who got into manga through scanlations alone and now go out and buy them. And some manga here are as popular as they are almost solely because they were first introduced through scanlations.

-Do you buy manga?
Most def. Though not all I read because its expensive and I need to eat.

-Do you think manga would be as popular outside of Japan without scanlations?
No. It would still be popular, maybe even a growing industry still but not near as big. Anime helped me learn about manga because when I saw DBZ manga and Yu-Gi-Oh! on the cover of Shonen Jump USA I thought I want that.

Asarii
September 21, 2010, 12:38 AM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
I read it for availability. Sometimes I simply want to rent manga. There are a few libraries I know that offer official publications but the titles are limited. I like variety! It's also a way for me to test-run a series to see if I love it enough to buy it.

How did you learn about scanlations?
My first scanlated manga was Inuyasha. I don't remember how I learned about scanlations though.

Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
I think it's promoting. If it wasn't for scanlations, non-licensed or "indie" mangas would never be known to the Western fandom. It's similar to how I encounter foreign musical artists on the Internet.

Do you buy the manga?
Most definitely. I try my best to support the mangaka. Although buying imported original tankoubons can be expensive, it requires a good scavenger hunt to find it at a reasonable price.

There's also nothing like curling up on a couch, drinking a cup of tea and reading manga It's a whole new experience to flip through the physical copy in your hands.

Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
Depends. Popular mangas would still be popular regardless of scanlations. If it's a small manga, it would be difficult for its name to be known internationally.

M3J
November 06, 2010, 09:20 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
How did you learn about scanlations?
Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Do you buy the manga?
Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?


I read scanlations as it's an easier access to the mangas I wanna read, as well as being cheap. Plus, many mangas I read aren't published into a tankoban, at least not where I live. Plus, not all bookstores have every volume of the manga. :(

I learned when I came across YouTube and started reading scanlated Naruto. I was kinda surprised at how far ahead it was.

It depends. It's promoting industry in some areas where there are no mangas, and in some areas it's hurting the industry as people can just buy the volume instead of reading it online, especially in Japan.

I don't. Monetary issues. :\

I don't think scanlations was the sole reason why concept of mangas caught up in other countries, but they did play a big part. By making mangas more accessible, more people can read it and take interest, and eventually even start buying.

Xadyu
November 06, 2010, 10:05 PM
Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
Because I can. If I want to keep track of great manga, buying volumes is not an option because it's too expensive, also, a lot of manga won't or might not be licensed outside of Japan. But I still want to read them.


How did you learn about scanlations?When I was just a small kid a store in the neighbourhood had new bargains involving comics, besides some well-know European comics, there was also Dragonball. It was cheap and I bought random volumes.


Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
Both. It's promoting manga in a good way, it's more accessible by people and fanbases can grow. Negative, however, are the people who refuse to support the industry by buying volumes because they can get everythign for free.


Do you buy the manga?
Yes. I don't have much, money is an issue, I have enough, but I don't prioritize manga (and such things) above my goals (study, work etc.) which is rather expensive. At random times I buy volumes, mostly by three, sometimes just one.


Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?I think that without scanlations, the manga industry outside of Japan would even be in a worse state then it now is. It's certainly growing, but it's still struggling, which saddens me. I, in fact, know a lot of business people from that industry and it seems that the reason it turns people off is that it's Japanese or meant for kids (this is probably because of more popular anime's aimed for kids; Pokemon, Digimon, Bakugan and the likes of). At least, that's what a number of petitions said.

inusama
November 13, 2010, 08:20 PM
1. Why do you read scanlations? Is it because it's faster, more accurate, etc?
just looking for new episodes or to a peek story
2. How did you learn about scanlations?
from friends and google/yahoo
3. Do you think it's hurting or promoting the industry as a whole, and why?
both, because we can get free manga which is someone's arts, and they get earn from making manga, that means they lost their earn. imagine if we have our own creation (could be anything) and then someone took it from us, it hurts i think.
but on the other hand, it does promote our creation. (ironic!)
4. Do you buy the manga?
yes, if i like the manga i will make saving and then buy it
5. Do you think that if it wasn't for scanlation, manga wouldn't be nearly as big in countries other than Japan?
hmm....i dont know, because in my country (indonesia) manga already entered since 1989, the first manga was candy-candy if i'm not mistaken. since then manga and animation became popular in here. so in indonesia scanlation is not the trigger. but i dont know in other countries, perhaps it'll be different answers.
but hopefully scanlation manga brings good things to us, and support the original manga too if have the opportunity. i cant imagine if the mangaka/creator is bankrupt :(