PDA

View Full Version : Misc Attempt I've finished cleaning, but the raws have still left their mark



Crude
September 07, 2009, 05:14 PM
Hey. I decided to scanlate Hokenshitsu no Shinigami by Aimoto Sho. It's a new series in Weekly Shounen Jump and I decided to scanlate it due to liking the one-shot and the authors previous series, Muddy, and also because I love the art. The cleaning process turned out quite well I think, but as I said in the title, the raws have left their mark. This is what I mean:

http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/7454/hokenshitsunoshinigamic.jpg

As you can see, there is a black line at the bottom of the image. That black line is actually a bit of the scanner that's visible. What I want to know is, what's the normal size (not file size by the way) a scanlated manga page should be? The raw was quite big actually. How and what program should I use to resize the image into the accepted size. Also, I'm having a little difficulty with double pages. Is there an easy way to join them together?

Thanks to anyone who can provide some help.

dosetsu
September 07, 2009, 08:02 PM
You re-size it to whatever you want that you feel is acceptable. Some prefer 1200px by height, I prefer 1600px. As for doubles, you'll just have to learn how to redraw, or simple don't redraw at all, keep them as single pages. There's no rule that you have to redraw doubles, it just gives a better flow.

unok-kun
September 07, 2009, 09:16 PM
There's some nice tool in Photoshop called the Crop Tool. With it, you have to select the whole image except the part where the black line is, so that there's nothing of the black line left in the selection. After that, press the Enter key and you'll get that part removed.

After that, resize. I recommend 1200px height or 1100px height, but always keep the same height (that's why you have to crop before resizing, since the part out of the page isn't always the same, if you crop after resizing, you'll get a different height on each page). To resize you don't need anything else than the "Image Size" option in Photoshop, just make sure that you have resample image and constrain proportions checked, and that in the selection box below you don't have nearest neighbor (I use bicubic).

To join double pages, note down the image size of each page. Create a new image with the biggest height of both pages, and the width of both pages added (so that both images fit there in the first place). Now copy the first page and paste it in the right side, and the second page on the left side (if you're not doing manga, it's the first in the left side and the second in the right, of course). Set the mode to the top layer to Darken, and move it so that it fits the other page. Brush the black zones that shouldn't be there with white in both layers, to not have a black zone covering the other page. Now, crop, and redraw the gaps, if any, to get a nice spread out of it. Finally, resize (there you see the reason why the height must be uniform and not the width).

[Ju-Ni]Vicissitude
September 08, 2009, 05:51 AM
Technically, that's not the top of my scanner. :3

But yes, it's a simple matter to just crop away the excess. I'd recommend rotating the page first to get the frames as straight as possible, then cropping away from all 4 sides. Yes, you lose a little bit from the edges, but the overall effect is much more visually appealing.

As for spreads, I increase the canvas width of one page to about 15" (bigger than the 2 pages put together so I have a bit of space to breathe) after any rotating the pages need. Then I copy the other into a new layer above it's opposite. Move the two pieces into place and make sure they line up as best they can. Once you're lined up, crop and do your precleaning.

In most cases, especially with patterns, it won't match up perfectly. The best you can do is try to match the art with the clone brush or (preferably), redrawing.

Esc.
September 08, 2009, 08:22 PM
It looks like the page still needs to be rotated a bit more clockwise anyway. So when you have the full sized raw, I'd ruler it out and make the best judgment possible to what you think looks straight, then rotate arbitrarily.

Then you'd have each side with parts that need to be cropped out, just like everyone said, and fix up the borders so that the page actually look straight by the end of it.

Cleaning-wise (depending on quality you're aiming for) it would be pretty hard and take extra long to meet the pages demands. Just like in Muddy, you see tones on the door frame, sometimes the suits have tones, tones are cool but if you clean them wrong they look like a mess. A pattern would be a lot easier but a lot of people simply grain the tones so it almost matches the original, which doesn't take too long.

Otherwise, fill in those blacks, fix up the grays a little bit and you've got a nice cleaned page on your hands. :tem

Crude
September 08, 2009, 09:59 PM
Thanks for the help guys!

L0ki
September 14, 2009, 06:10 PM
Looks like you used the diffuse filter to do the precleaning, right? Those blacks could use some burning... and there's some dust which can be easily removed with the brush.

riresti
November 03, 2009, 09:44 PM
I accept with information: Cleaning-wise (depending on quality you're aiming for) it would be pretty hard and take extra long to meet the pages demands. Just like in Muddy, you see tones on the door frame, sometimes the suits have tones, tones are cool but if you clean them wrong they look like a mess. A pattern would be a lot easier but a lot of people simply grain the tones so it almost matches the original.