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MyOnlyStar
October 24, 2006, 03:23 AM
I'm sure some of you know by now I am deaf and wear a Cochlear Implant. Most of you also know GoldKnight is also deaf. If you would like to know what it's like being deaf, then ask away in this thread. I'll answer! Maybe GoldKnight too.

kiddo7
October 24, 2006, 12:07 PM
blindness and deafness have intersted me for a long time. I think people who are blind or deaf and learn to live with it, are the coolest most awesome dudes around.

sometimes i wonder what i would do I f I lost my sight or hearing and if I could get on with life. I could almost imagine getting used to not seeing but hearing is somehow different.

anyway my first question to you is this:
where you born deaf or was there a time when you could hear? and you said you have some kind of an implant, does this mean that you have some hearing when using it?

mozetsu
October 25, 2006, 03:57 AM
is it like a hearing aid, or is it different? i know about hearing aids cuz my grandma is kinda deaf, but her's is more of age-related...

Geo
October 25, 2006, 05:40 PM
Like blind people, do other senses increases? Like sight or something?

MyOnlyStar
October 25, 2006, 11:28 PM
blindness and deafness have intersted me for a long time. I think people who are blind or deaf and learn to live with it, are the coolest most awesome dudes around.

sometimes i wonder what i would do I f I lost my sight or hearing and if I could get on with life. I could almost imagine getting used to not seeing but hearing is somehow different.

anyway my first question to you is this:
where you born deaf or was there a time when you could hear? and you said you have some kind of an
implant, does this mean that you have some hearing when using it?




is it like a hearing aid, or is it different? i know about hearing aids cuz my grandma is kinda deaf, but her's is more of age-related...



I was born profoundly deaf. There is a scale of hearing loss, ranging from mild to profound, with profound being the worst.

When I say Implant, I'm referring to a device called the Cochlear Implant. A surgeon operates on the patient by making an incision behind the ear and taking out some stuff to put in a device. After the incision heals, An external device connects to the internal device through a magnet. So basically, the internal device is in the ear, skin separates the internal and external device, and they are connected by a magnet.

You can easily take off and on the external device, the magnet is just to transmit information to the internal device, which in turns send information to the hearing system and bypassing the cochlear. The Cochlear Implant is actually meant to substitute for the damaged cochlear.

The external looks much like a hearing aid, except the hardware and programming is entirely different. While a hearing aid merely amplifies sounds, the CI (cochlear implant) recieves sounds and transmits the sound as electronic data/sound. The brain eventually learns to interpret the electronic sound as words, etc.

The CI hearing quality is by no way equal to a normal ear. The range of sound/frequency is vastly inferior and the device is geared toward conversation between two people because technology has not yet advanced enough to be able to handle a crowd, etc. While I CAN talk to people, the more people that are talking or the louder it is, the less I am able to understand.

The CI and hearing aids are two ways to handle hearing loss, but CI is for people with at least severe hearing loss and hearing aids are for people that were born with mild/moderate hearing loss.




Like blind people, do other senses increases? Like sight or something?


People with profound or severe hearing loss have said they experience a quality in their eyesight, mostly the ability to detect motion. I actually have no experience in this, because my CI takes up the part of the brain for hearing. If that part of my brain wasn't used for my CI to hear, then that part of the brain might have been used towards augmenting my sight.

gian
October 26, 2006, 01:41 AM
So can you listen to music with the CI or does it disrupt notes?

DemonDays
October 26, 2006, 05:34 AM
Ive always wondered do people with impaired hearing use the vibrations that sound makes instead?

MyOnlyStar
October 26, 2006, 06:23 AM
So can you listen to music with the CI or does it disrupt notes?


I can't really listen to music. This varies from person to person, but I can't hear the lyrics or really get the beat. I know someone with a CI who can, so I'm planning to buy an Ipod to try to be able to do the same. :)



Ive always wondered do people with impaired hearing use the vibrations that sound makes instead?


It's actually the other way around, vibrations create sound. So, no...

DemonDays
October 26, 2006, 11:26 AM
It's actually the other way around, vibrations create sound. So, no...


I meant it more as in feeling the vibrations, like a car coming down the road, you can feel the vibrations it makes on the road.

MyOnlyStar
October 27, 2006, 09:34 PM
I meant it more as in feeling the vibrations, like a car coming down the road, you can feel the vibrations it makes on the road.


I have no experience in this area, but on my part, no, I can't use those kind of vibrations. :dunno:

Ask Goldknight, he doesn't use a CI so he might know from his own experiences. Paging GoldKnight to this thread. :hi5

Gold Knight
January 16, 2007, 05:23 AM
Never knew this thread was here until now, heh. Guess MyOnlyStar forgot to page me.

As for feeling the vibrations that a vehicle makes on the road, depends on the vehicle really and how loud it is. A motorcycle, interestingly enough, I can feel the vibrations more than a car. Some trucks, also. I used to live close to a railroad and I definitely could feel the train even from my own room in an apartment I was living in at the time. But a normal car, not usually. You really do have to look both ways when crossing a street if you're deaf, never hurts to be cautious.

Lohnt
January 17, 2007, 02:01 AM
Do you find that reading lips is an actual art you can acquire or do you find that it's kind of fake?

Do you can make out words when looking at a persons mouth, but you can't really understand what someone is saying if you randomly look at them from a distance, or do you find you know what anyone anywhere is saying as long as you have a clear view of their mouth?

deathshadow25
January 17, 2007, 02:29 PM
My father is actually legally deaf. It's really hard talking to im sometimes cause he is old and doesn't know sign language. I also have second cousin who is born deaf and she has been teaching me sign language. I haven't talked to her inawhile though because she lives pretty far.

My father can hear a little bit on cell phones though but our regular phone in the house he can't hear too well in.

@refii I'm not too sure about reading lips but I think you need a clear picture of their mouth because thats what my dad does since he can't use sign language h reads lips and you need to be a distance so he can read your lips. Also i'm not too sure if this is only my dad but you need to talk at a normal speed so he can read your lips.

Gold Knight
January 17, 2007, 09:04 PM
Do you find that reading lips is an actual art you can acquire or do you find that it's kind of fake?

Fake? No, it's a pretty ingenious skill to have. It takes a great deal of experience reading the lips because in English only around about 30% of the language is definitely shown on the lips, the rest is all guesswork depending on the context of what's being said. It takes a lot of smarts and people-reading ability to be great at it. Most deaf people are at least average at lip-reading just out of necessity (including myself) but there are these whose lifestyle practically depends on being able to be a great lip-reader. But there's still a high probability of misunderstanding people either way. That's why I mostly like to discuss business on paper or via instant messaging on the internet (like I do with my photography agencies). It's also good to have the information handy whenever I need it anyway so I don't forget, just like a grocery list.


Do you can make out words when looking at a persons mouth, but you can't really understand what someone is saying if you randomly look at them from a distance, or do you find you know what anyone anywhere is saying as long as you have a clear view of their mouth?


Distance doesn't really matter as long as you can see the lips clearly.



My father is actually legally deaf. It's really hard talking to im sometimes cause he is old and doesn't know sign language. I also have second cousin who is born deaf and she has been teaching me sign language. I haven't talked to her inawhile though because she lives pretty far.

Yeah, deaf people who can't communicate are kind of a sad circumstance, but it still happens a lot, especially with older people. But we just passed into a new era where communication has never been more easier for deaf people. So hopefully that's something we'll be continuing to improve on for future generations of kids. Most important thing is deaf kids having patient and understanding and loving parents taking care of them, which I had in my case.

Cool that you're learning sign language.

Something I'd like to add about that though. Whenever people are trying to learn sign language, they are usually so excited about it, they can be annoying at times for deaf people. So be sure to try to keep your conversation casual and easy going so you don't scare off your second cousin, heh.



@refii I'm not too sure about reading lips but I think you need a clear picture of their mouth because thats what my dad does since he can't use sign language h reads lips and you need to be a distance so he can read your lips. Also i'm not too sure if this is only my dad but you need to talk at a normal speed so he can read your lips.


Yes, normal speed is right as well. Talking too slow can actually be a hindrance because it's not the normal flow of speaking that deaf people are more accustomed to watching.

Aladar
January 18, 2007, 11:57 AM
Is the sign language tough? How long does it take you, to learn it?

Pevee
January 18, 2007, 11:56 PM
Is the sign language tough? How long does it take you, to learn it?

There're a lot of people who take ASL (american sign language) at my school, and they say it's not that hard.

Without hearing aids, can people who were born deaf hear themselves speak? This has been bothering me since I was soo little. One more, if one were to born deaf and can't hear anything at all, is it highly likely that he would be mute also since he can't hear others, don't know what words sound like , and therefore cannot make the sound of the words?
Yes, this may sound very ignorant, but I'm very curious, I've always been, since I was so little, I've also asked my dad about this a lot of times but he can't give me the answer.

yira_heerai
January 19, 2007, 12:15 AM
I'm sure some of you know by now I am deaf and wear a Cochlear Implant. Most of you also know GoldKnight is also deaf. If you would like to know what it's like being deaf, then ask away in this thread. I'll answer! Maybe GoldKnight too.


Huh. I wouldn't have thought I'd see a thread like this on here. I'm mostly deaf myself (There's none in my right ear and probably a 75% loss in my left). Sign language has been a bit of a struggle for me simply because the town I live in is very small. I haven't really ran into anyone else who needs it or uses it, so I don't get much practice.

May I ask if it you became deaf before or after the Implants? There's been discussion about me getting them, but only as a last resort o_o;

MyOnlyStar
January 21, 2007, 07:42 AM
I was born profoundly deaf due to Waardenburg Syndrome. I highly recomend CI's,...but i've had them since I was four so I don't really have experience without them.

Gold Knight
September 19, 2007, 07:13 PM
Was browsing for old threads... happened to come across this one again. Late replies, but better late than never...


Is the sign language tough? How long does it take you, to learn it?

Well, Sign Language was the first language I learned, so I'm sure it took me as long as it did for you to learn your own initial language. For later vocabulary, it sort of went hand-in-hand. I learn new English words, then learn the signs for them.

There are occasionally different "local signs" for certain words though - one of the most annoying things about sign language is that I always had to change a few signs that I had gotten into the habit of signing, whenever I moved to a new state. Even within America, it's really not an universal language at all, which is annoying XD


There're a lot of people who take ASL (american sign language) at my school, and they say it's not that hard.

Not that hard... BUT easy to forget. Gotta keep in practice somehow.



Without hearing aids, can people who were born deaf hear themselves speak? This has been bothering me since I was soo little. One more, if one were to born deaf and can't hear anything at all, is it highly likely that he would be mute also since he can't hear others, don't know what words sound like , and therefore cannot make the sound of the words?
Yes, this may sound very ignorant, but I'm very curious, I've always been, since I was so little, I've also asked my dad about this a lot of times but he can't give me the answer.

Well, my deafness was so profound that, I guess, hearing aids were difficult for me - they did warn me whenever there was a sound, but I could never tell what it was, where it came from, etc. Though, of course, I would know that the sounds were coming from myself when I was making them, since, what else could it be? XD


Huh. I wouldn't have thought I'd see a thread like this on here. I'm mostly deaf myself (There's none in my right ear and probably a 75% loss in my left). Sign language has been a bit of a struggle for me simply because the town I live in is very small. I haven't really ran into anyone else who needs it or uses it, so I don't get much practice.

Yeah, I've always had that problem myself since middle school. I'm lucky to have parents who learned sign language themselves as well, because otherwise I would probably have forgotten it all by now, I bet.



May I ask if it you became deaf before or after the Implants? There's been discussion about me getting them, but only as a last resort o_o;

It is pretty much the last resort, but they're getting better and better, apparently, every five years. It may come to a point where there won't be any deafness anymore.

I don't have implants myself (and I'm glad I refused because at the time implants sucked, to be frank) - just because I didn't like the idea of having something stuck inside my head, and I was pretty much used to being deaf and I was always able to handle it well, and I didn't really see hearing as being that important in my life. It really depends on whether you believe that it could help your life to a great extent, or whether it'll be just the same ol same.

Dragonzair
September 25, 2007, 03:20 PM
Aiyah, this reminds me of the thread Ken-chan made at NF :D I always wondered about the CI, so it's nice to know how it works.


Without hearing aids, can people who were born deaf hear themselves speak? This has been bothering me since I was soo little. One more, if one were to born deaf and can't hear anything at all, is it highly likely that he would be mute also since he can't hear others, don't know what words sound like , and therefore cannot make the sound of the words?
Yes, this may sound very ignorant, but I'm very curious, I've always been, since I was so little, I've also asked my dad about this a lot of times but he can't give me the answer.


Well, my deafness was so profound that, I guess, hearing aids were difficult for me - they did warn me whenever there was a sound, but I could never tell what it was, where it came from, etc. Though, of course, I would know that the sounds were coming from myself when I was making them, since, what else could it be? XD

This also includes the fact that not knowing how words sound like, can also create problems with words written down, or typed.

I mean by, if someone starts typing in leet language, it would be hard for deaf people to undestand what is being written (to be honest, trying to read it normally is bothersome and wastes time a well).

One question, when around others who don't know sign language, would you prefer to gesture in an easy way to them (and them to you), or just have them write down to you, and vice versa?

Reason I',m asking is, if I do visit Ken-chan, I was wondering whether I should come prepared with a mini-board, or those magnet-pen thingies :D

Gold Knight
October 01, 2007, 08:26 AM
Whichever works for the other party the best - I don't mind writing at all, but gesturing (if you meant signing) would probably get the point across more quickly. But I like more involved conversations than that, so I'd probably go for writing. I'd like to say that neither would be necessary as I could read lips, but I'm afraid I'm probably so out of practice right now (after being out of college over two years) that I'd probably make some mistakes. ^^;

But don't worry about coming prepared with a mini-board or magnet-pen thingies as I'll probably have pads and pens ^^ (I'm not crazy about these magnet-pen thingies to be honest xD)

matsyes
October 08, 2007, 05:01 AM
So GK without any form of audio feedback , How did you teach yourself to speak? ...If I put on a pair of headphones I often don't know when I start screaming while speaking so modulation of tone and all would be a lot more difficult. Also when u read books and stuff and it says a whisper or a loud crash ...How do you perceive it??

Gold Knight
October 10, 2007, 11:25 AM
I had a speech therapist throughout high school that showed me how sounds "felt" through putting my hand on her throat and she told me where the tongue should be for each word, etc. I'd try saying words and she would tell me when I'd get it right. But yeah, one big disadvantage for deaf people as far as learning how to speak is that they can never be sure that they said it right. People who are hard of hearing have it a bit easier as they can hear some of the sounds they make, and also people with cochlear implants and hearing aids that work well for them. I'm not any of these people, so it was much harder for me, but I somehow got the hang of it - but I'm still not that great. I can't get a few letters (though most deaf people do usually have an accent and replace a letter they can't get for another letter that they can say, kinda like the Japanese as far as L and R. I usually don't bother and try to select words that I can say correctly rather than words I'd bungle up, so...)

There's one amusing note for myself, I seem to actually be easier to understand when I relax (such as when I get a bit drunk) so my rugby teammates actually understood me better and better. Usually it's the opposite for people who get drunk, huh?

Reading books and learning about speech effects, I think comes from how I read comics and saw all the "loud sounds" THACK and THUD and CRASH and all that, and sometimes people will whisper within sound balloons with very small text, so I got the gist of what these sounds were all about. I also can feel sounds pretty keenly, so I guess it's all about vibrations to me... like I usually associate feeling loud sounds as feeling a "CRASH" and feeling repetitive sounds as "tap tap tap" or "knock knock knock." I'll probably never know how to whisper or what it's like though.

ChaosCloud
October 16, 2007, 03:05 AM
so did u learn lip reading?

Gold Knight
October 16, 2007, 05:33 PM
Yeah. I'm not great at it, but usually if you say the same thing twice at least, I'll get it the second time at least. 25% of the time I'll get the first time, depending on how the person lips move and the speed at how they're talking (slow is even worse.) But I'm definitely not as good as deaf people who don't sign, who have to rely on it totally to communicate with everybody.

gdupninja
October 16, 2007, 05:46 PM
Damn Sometimes people take things for granted because they are normal. It must be tough on yall not being able to hear and all but I respect the way yall deal with being hearing impaired. Im not saying I do but I kinda know how it feels to be impaired in a but not like you two. Im not really allowed to participate in sports anymore because if I were to pop my right knee out of place again I will need to get my whole knee cap replaced and then i'll be screwed. It sucked going to basketball practice just to watch. I still sneak around play but I cant go serious and it really sucks. Well its not like im deaf or blind but i thought i should share a bit. It's cool to see yall are getting through even with such a tough enemy. Keep on pushing yall and dont let anyone slow you down or tell you that you cant do something.

Gold Knight
October 16, 2007, 05:58 PM
Thanks and I've never let it get in my way before, I won't any time soon. I played sports too, even being deaf. While I certainly took some hits, I gave my share of 'em too :D Sorry about your knee. If it's any consolation, everybody eventually ends up on the bench anyway.

gdupninja
October 16, 2007, 06:00 PM
Yeah thats what you got to do. What sport did you play? How did you communicate with your teammates effictively?

Gold Knight
October 16, 2007, 06:06 PM
I played baseball, football, and ran track in high school, and played rugby in college.

Football wasn't that tough as I played middle linebacker. Basically the strong linebacker took the calls instead of me and gave it to the huddle, and the only things I really had to worry about was calling out "run" or "pass" when I saw it happening, to alert my guys to the play. Otherwise I just watched the quarterback. I had pretty good vision and ball instincts. It's also pretty easy for deaf guys to play linemen too. I played running back and wide receiver on offense though, and again, neither really required any great communication besides knowing the play call from the signals. On the sidelines I had an interpreter for whenever the coaches or my teammates needed to talk to me.

Rugby was even easier - when playing the sport, you almost never stop except when the ball goes out of bound. You pretty much just had to handle what was front in you. I was pretty good at catching the player with the ball, and hitting the snot out of them even if they got the ball off. That's all they asked of me to do. I played the "hooker" position too, and I had the exact right build for it. But I did have to watch for the wingback's signal for when he was tossing the ball under the scrum.

Track... again, not much communication involved.

Baseball was actually the toughest sport to communicate with your teammates, but that was probably because of the position I played, catcher - NOT a good position for deaf people, because of all the teamwork needed with the pitcher :/ But I've known deaf guys who've pitched, and it worked, but it's still pretty amazing. But I did eventually give up baseball, I just found it too frustrating (and besides which, we had several good catchers on the team already, anyway.)

matsyes
October 22, 2007, 12:46 AM
There's one amusing note for myself, I seem to actually be easier to understand when I relax (such as when I get a bit drunk) so my rugby teammates actually understood me better and better. Usually it's the opposite for people who get drunk, huh?

Reading books and learning about speech effects, I think comes from how I read comics and saw all the "loud sounds" THACK and THUD and CRASH and all that, and sometimes people will whisper within sound balloons with very small text, so I got the gist of what these sounds were all about. I also can feel sounds pretty keenly, so I guess it's all about vibrations to me... like I usually associate feeling loud sounds as feeling a "CRASH" and feeling repetitive sounds as "tap tap tap" or "knock knock knock." I'll probably never know how to whisper or what it's like though.

lol so being sober is actually bad for ur communication :D

I tried to feel sounds through vibrations and its pretty interesting. You never realize that sounds makes so many vibrations until you try it out. Pretty cool.

Gold Knight
October 22, 2007, 03:43 AM
Yeah, I tend to be too uptight sometimes when I try to make myself understood using my voice, drinking definitely helps me with that. lol

Yes, sounds through vibrations are pretty cool - and I really couldn't imagine life without vibrations. I can "feel" when anybody is coming into the room anywhere in my house because of the floor. I'm still not easily caught off guard. Outdoors, I can't, though.

kiddo7
October 22, 2007, 07:43 AM
wow, do you watch avatar the last airbender? your last statement reminds me of toph a blind girl who also happens to be one off the coolest and most badass characters on the show. I always thought her sensing a presence through the vibrations in the floor was exaggerated, but you are saying it is possible. That is pretty cool.

matsyes
October 23, 2007, 02:59 AM
wow, do you watch avatar the last airbender? your last statement reminds me of toph a blind girl who also happens to be one off the coolest and most badass characters on the show. I always thought her sensing a presence through the vibrations in the floor was exaggerated, but you are saying it is possible. That is pretty cool.

Yeah it reminded me to of toph ...Though toph can do it thru earth bending so its a lot more exaggerated on the show :)

Dude being able to "feel" anyone in the house is too cool ... Ur like karin with vibrations :D

Absolutio
October 27, 2007, 09:45 PM
I had a speech therapist throughout high school that showed me how sounds "felt" through putting my hand on her throat and she told me where the tongue should be for each word, etc. I'd try saying words and she would tell me when I'd get it right. But yeah, one big disadvantage for deaf people as far as learning how to speak is that they can never be sure that they said it right. People who are hard of hearing have it a bit easier as they can hear some of the sounds they make, and also people with cochlear implants and hearing aids that work well for them. I'm not any of these people, so it was much harder for me, but I somehow got the hang of it - but I'm still not that great. I can't get a few letters (though most deaf people do usually have an accent and replace a letter they can't get for another letter that they can say, kinda like the Japanese as far as L and R. I usually don't bother and try to select words that I can say correctly rather than words I'd bungle up, so...)

I was wondering, since you don't know how the vowels and words actually sound like, when you read (anything), do you imagine the word's feeling? I mean, when people read, they're like chanting the words in their heads (even if they don't notice it), so are deaf people imagine how the words feel? :o

HisshouBuraiKen
November 02, 2007, 10:47 AM
^^ Actually, I have a similar question. I onced asked a deaf friend of mine the same thing, I'm curious about your responses:

When you read or write, do you see the signs for all or some of the words in your mind's eye? I know when I read or write, most of the time I hear the words in my head as I go.

My friend said she does sometimes, for words that jump out at her or stand out (which makes sense). what about you guys?

erikrhys
November 03, 2007, 01:56 AM
have you ever played an instrument? if so, what is it like?..................

Gold Knight
November 04, 2007, 12:02 AM
Sorry for the delay of answers guys. I keep forgetting to check back to this thread.


wow, do you watch avatar the last airbender? your last statement reminds me of toph a blind girl who also happens to be one off the coolest and most badass characters on the show. I always thought her sensing a presence through the vibrations in the floor was exaggerated, but you are saying it is possible. That is pretty cool.

Nope, I don't watch Avatar, though I've glimpsed it every now and then. That character sounds cool though.

There's also a American comic book character named Echo, a deaf girl, who has the ability to instantaneously mimic anybody that she sees - including fighting techniques, etc. Though I don't possess the same kind of immediate memory, I do think I'm also able to watch movements to the point where I can copy them more quickly. This helped me in football.

Funny story here too... when I was a little kid, I had to do a game of musical chairs in school - four chairs, having to sit down when the music stops. Last one to sit down was dropped out. There was a woman at a piano, her hands were out of sight, and they thought all I could depend on was how I followed the music by feeling. But I was so good at it, they figured out that it had to be something else that I was doing. Took them a while, but they finally figured it out - I was watching her feet moving, and when they stopped tapping the floor, I sat down.

I'm not sure, but I do think we deaf people have better instincts for that sort of thing.



Dude being able to "feel" anyone in the house is too cool ... Ur like karin with vibrations :D

Heh, only inside a house. Outside the house, it's gotta be pretty earth-shaking. I still have to make sure to look for incoming cars when crossing the street.


I was wondering, since you don't know how the vowels and words actually sound like, when you read (anything), do you imagine the word's feeling? I mean, when people read, they're like chanting the words in their heads (even if they don't notice it), so are deaf people imagine how the words feel? :o

Though I might actually have different interpretations, I think my speech therapy classes, which trained me to be able to feel the sounds within my throat as to know how to best manipulate and vocalize them, do help me have a sense of what a word "feels" like. I know when a word seems more quickly said than others, and I'm kind of really aware of the beat of syllables. Have to be.

To sum that answer up (maybe a bit confusing) I do think we can imagine what the words feel like. There are also some of us with hearing aids and cochlear implants (that work for us) where it's made even easier. (I'm not one of them though.)


^^ Actually, I have a similar question. I onced asked a deaf friend of mine the same thing, I'm curious about your responses:

When you read or write, do you see the signs for all or some of the words in your mind's eye? I know when I read or write, most of the time I hear the words in my head as I go.

My friend said she does sometimes, for words that jump out at her or stand out (which makes sense). what about you guys?

A few words. Especially ones where I'm fond of the signs. Some basic words too, like "yes" and "no" too. Animal signs definitely. "Duck" I always think of the sign for it (which is basically your hand making a beak in front of your face). "Lion" is another one where you "comb" your hand over your hair, mimicking a mane. "Bear," "cat," "dog"... etc. I also think of some common materials, such as the sign for "paper," "rock," "door," "table," "TV," "bed." Okay, more than a few words.

But overall, I don't sign nearly enough to think in terms of signs all the time, though. About the only people I sign with on a constant basis are my parents, and for a while there in college, my ex-girlfriend Meg. Because of that I think I see the written word more often in my mind than a sign for it. Sorry if that's a bit of a disappointing answer.

But if it's any consolation, I'd bet there are some deaf people out there who do think in terms of signs on a probably more frequent basis.


have you ever played an instrument? if so, what is it like?..................

Nope. No interest either, really. I was always more into reading and drawing.

igotthegoods
December 12, 2007, 03:20 AM
interesting thread...a couple of questions....

1. i've always wondered this, but how exactly do the TTY phone lines work? do you ever use them?

2. do you have a cell phone that you use for text messaging? is that something that you would be interested in? texting is so popular and it's fairly cheap to get a plan with unlimited texting, although you'd have to still pay the monthly fee for minutes you're not using.....hmmmm, would it really be worth it?