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Thread: Naruto Names and Meanings

  1. #16
    Translator 中級員 / Chuukyuuin / Member Rikki-Tikki-Tavi's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by tgrudo
    Like is there a meaning to dattebayo?
    I added that. Thanks for the suggestion.
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  2. #17
    Last Boss ♪~( ̄。 ̄) 有名人 / Yuumeijin / Celebrity njt's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    A few things I'd like to comment on

    1) The color is only for when we put a bunch of translations together so as not to confuse eachother.
    2) it's jiraiYA
    3) For dattebayo, I kinda dissagree, since da is the informal version of desu(is and general "ender"), and tteba is the "self quote" thing you attach to the end of what you are saying, then yo to give it more umph, or the exclamation point like you said.
    so- an example
    arigatou (thanks)
    arigatou tte (he / she / they said thanks)
    arigatou tte ba yo (*in a lame and dirt literal translation you'd say* "and I said thanks!", but yeah- it's better something like "Thanks, and I mean it!" also translation differs between context and what not, like the american version of Naruto says " Believe it" which carries the feeling of it quite well in some circumstances.

    Also-I totally spaced out that I knew of a site that had quite a bit of this stuff already researched and done really well, it's this:
    http://home.wanadoo.nl/debbie.kiki/

    But that doesn't mean this thread can go to a waste, seeing as she didn't explain the Kanji one by one on all the names / jutsu then we can talk about them here, or you can cover things that haven't been mention / lack at that site.

    And one final thing, we don't add (s) to the end of Japanese words, they take the non count noun stance. So it'd be I have 1 manga, I have 2 manga. Just FYI, I learned this recently too hehe.

    Serizawa: But it's really heartwarming to see such good guys - perhaps not as good as we wanted, translation-wise, but their hearts are already grade A
    If you see a mistake in my translations, let me know! Thanks Click a frog to see my Resume!!

  3. #18
    Registered User 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    Since there's so much mention of Jiraiya, I just have to ask this here; what is the symbol on Jiraiya's forehead protector ?
    Guard your honor. Let your reputation fall where it will. And outlive the bastards.<br /><br />

  4. #19
    Translator 中級員 / Chuukyuuin / Member Rikki-Tikki-Tavi's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    油 means oil, but I could not find anything but speculations about a deeper meaning.
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  5. #20
    Translator 上級員 / Jyoukuuin / Sr. Member
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    1. ~da is added to a verbless sentence (there is no verb for "to be" in Japan, so that's a verbless sentence) when you don't want to be polite. When there is a verb in the sentence Naruto only says ~ttebayo.
    Well, there is much to say about the verb "to be" in Japanese, all of it confusing.

    I'm spoiler tagging this so people who are not interested in Japanese at all can skip this.

    Spoiler show

    A famous and controversial line from the manga (which I'm spoiler tagging to be on the safe side) is a good example:

    Spoiler show


    Finally, we have the thing that appears in da-tte-ba-yo:

    Spoiler show


    As for the exact meaning of dattebayo, first it needs to be cleared up that it's technically not "dattebayo", it's "ttebayo". Naruto doesn't add the copula unless you'd use it anyway.

    For instance, you don't usually say "urusai desu", you say "urusai!" or "urusee!", so Naruto goes "urusee-ttebayo!"

    In one of the databooks (the first one, I think), Kishimoto is asked why "ttebayo", and his answer is "because it sounds child-like". As I understood it, he means for it to express Naruto's youthful, excess energy, but has no particular meaning. I guess it's just meant to add "punch" to Naruto's lines.

    In other words, what NJT said.   [br]Posted at: April 04, 2006, 07:50:44 PM_________________________________________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    油 means oil, but I could not find anything but speculations about a deeper meaning.
    I can't be sure, but I remember Kishimoto mentioning in the databook that, at first, Jiraiya was going to be an 油っぽいおっさん, which I interpret as a "greasy middle aged man". His character design changed, but it may have something to do with that.

    It may effectively be a play on that former design and the fact that what Jiraiya loves most (next to women) is "freedom" or "jiyuu", the "yuu" coinciding with the right-hand radical of 油 and sharing the same chinese reading.[br]Posted at: April 04, 2006, 07:56:33 PM_________________________________________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    Jiraiya: 自来也  (self+to come+[a sum of money]) = shows up when ever he wants
    Note: I chose to ignore the last kanji, because it is not taught in Japanese schools and thus most Japanese don't know it's meaning. We can safely assume that the mangaka only wanted the sound of it.


    Dunno much about this particular Kanji, but it's often found in names. If a man's name ends in "ya", there's a good chance that's the character it's written with.

    But Jiraiya is not a name made up by Kishimoto, but that of a popular character in Japanese folklore... same goes for the other two Sannin.

    I know Nick knows more about this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    Also: NO! NO! NO! "to come" does not have that meaning in Japanese! Stop thinking like that!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    Yes, that would be the opposite verb, iku. Icchau would be involuntary form of the verb.

    And while we're at it and for the record, I'm also convinced the original translations got the name of Jiraiya's book, "icha-icha paradise", wrong. It's not "come-come paradise", it's "cuddle paradise" or, at most, "make-out paradise". If my reasoning is correct, it-s "icha" not from "icchau", but from "ichatsuku", which means... ahem...

    (1)男女が体を寄せ合ったりしてふざけあう

    For a man and a women to get close to each other and mess around (lit. translation!)

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  7. #21
    Translator 初心者/ Shoshinsha / Beginner ShounenSuki's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    YAY~ I am famou~s ^^

    About Gaara's name; it was actually explained in the manga. His name comes from 「我を愛する修羅」 "A self-loving [scene of] carnage"
    If you want to break it down to it's kanji.
    我 = ware "I," "Myself"
    愛 = Ai "Love"
    羅 = Ra "Gauze," "Thin silk"
    羅 is mostly used for its pronunciation, rather then its meaning, though. In this case, it's the last kanji in the word 修羅 (Shura, "Scene of carnage").

  8. #22
    Last Boss ♪~( ̄。 ̄) 有名人 / Yuumeijin / Celebrity njt's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by ShounenSuki
    YAY~ I am famou~s ^^

    About Gaara's name; it was actually explained in the manga. His name comes from 「我を愛する修羅」 "A self-loving [scene of] carnage"
    If you want to break it down to it's kanji.
    我 = ware "I," "Myself"
    愛 = Ai "Love"
    羅 = Ra "Gauze," "Thin silk"
    羅 is mostly used for its pronunciation, rather then its meaning, though. In this case, it's the last kanji in the word 修羅 (Shura, "Scene of carnage").
    Yep, I remeber having to retranslate that entire chapter (check my past translations ) but since you had already translated I thought to direct to your site (great work by the way )

    As to iwanin thanks for going into more detail. I'm sure everyone will benefit from that
    Serizawa: But it's really heartwarming to see such good guys - perhaps not as good as we wanted, translation-wise, but their hearts are already grade A
    If you see a mistake in my translations, let me know! Thanks Click a frog to see my Resume!!

  9. #23
    Translator 上級員 / Jyoukuuin / Sr. Member Nihongaeri's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    1. Some names i.e. "Naruto" or "Kakashi" are written in kana... So when writing "Naruto", Kishimoto might have a certain meaning in mind, but we will prolly never know.
    Don't have much time to respond to anything, but... For many (almost all?) of the names in Naruto, despite being written in kana, it is very clear what their intended "meaning" was. The site NJT listed already has pretty much everything listed that you could possibly want (perhaps too much in places), but to sum things up, the names of many characters are very, very clear puns. For instance, "Hatake Kakashi" is "field scarecrow", "Haruno Sakura" phonetically becomes "cherry blossom/tree of the spring", and "Yamanaka Ino" obviously "boar in the mountains"... But the above link lists all these and more.

    Related to this, given the presence of names as ridiculous as, say, "Umino Iruka", or "marine dolphin/dolphin of the sea", I firmly believe that anybody who refuses to believe that マイト・ガイ is indeed intended as "Might Guy" is delusional... But I guess that's another issue.[br]Posted at: April 05, 2006, 08:33:28 AM_________________________________________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Iwanin
    I know Nick knows more about this.
    You assume too much.

    But on the subject of the "translation" of kanji based names, I typically prefer not to. The reason being that, all to often, you just aren't able to accurately predict (without doing extensive research, that is) with what intention the name's characters were chosen. 自来也 "Jiraiya" would certainly be a good example of this. My wife's name, 周子 "Shuuko", would be another (supposedly the characters were assigned with a meaning of "a child who thinks fast", or so I'm told).[br]Posted at: April 05, 2006, 09:06:34 AM_________________________________________________Did a tad bit of research on the name 自来也. It of course appeared in Japanese fiction (during the 1800s, so it's not all that old), but the character was, in part at least, an adaptation of a character that appeared in Chinese fiction. This character's name was 我来也 because he would write this on the wall of the houses he stole from. In other words, at least in its original Chinese form, it's something along the lines of "I was here". Also, the name Jiraiya, through Japanese fiction, has over time become entwined with ninja mythology in general (there have apparently been any number of ninja stories over the years containing a character named Jiraiya), and as such it was prime material to be included in Naruto.
    出産間近のうちの妻曰く「お産だけに、押さんといて!」
    そう。女性とは言えど見事に親父ギャグを発するのである。

  10. #24
    Translator 中級員 / Chuukyuuin / Member Rikki-Tikki-Tavi's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by Nihongaeri
    For instance, "Hatake Kakashi" is "field scarecrow", "Haruno Sakura" phonetically becomes "cherry blossom/tree of the spring", and "Yamanaka Ino" obviously "boar in the mountains"... But the above link lists all these and more.
    I don't dare contradict the great Nihongaeri, but might I add, that the examples you gave have all have Kanji last names which show the meaning and that I allready mentioned that there are names that are really clear...[br]Posted at: April 05, 2006, 06:01:11 PM_________________________________________________
    Quote Originally Posted by Iwanin
    Yes, that would be the opposite verb, iku. Icchau would be involuntary form of the verb.

    And while we're at it and for the record, I'm also convinced the original translations got the name of Jiraiya's book, "icha-icha paradise", wrong. It's not "come-come paradise", it's "cuddle paradise" or, at most, "make-out paradise". If my reasoning is correct, it-s "icha" not from "icchau", but from "ichatsuku", which means... ahem...
    As far as I know イチャイチャ is an onomatopoeia mimicing the sound of ppl cuddling... it's wierd what the Japanese have soundwords for... there is litteraly thousands of them.
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  12. #25
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    I don't dare contradict the great Nihongaeri, but might I add, that the examples you gave have all have Kanji last names which show the meaning and that I allready mentioned that there are names that are really clear...
    I think that what Nihongaeri is trying to say is that, the fact that they're written in katakana not withstanding, at least *part* of the intended meaning of the vast majority of the names is clear, from Uzumaki Naruto to Akasuna no Sasori.

    Though it's true that some, like "Deidara", are not entirely clear. I dunno - has Kishi ever said why he named the character after a fictional giant?

  13. #26
    Translator 上級員 / Jyoukuuin / Sr. Member Nihongaeri's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    the examples you gave have all have Kanji last names which show the meaning
    Being anal here, but "Hatake Kakashi" and "Umino Iruka" are all kana, surname and given name alike...

    But what I was trying to say, just like Iwanin pointed out, is that whether or not names contain kanji does not necessarily correlate with whether or not there is a clear meaning or intent behind the naming. You seemed to infer that the kanji would be required to determine what the intention of the name creator was, at least in the case of the name Naruto.

    The other thing I was trying to say is that, on the other end of things, just because a name has kanji does not mean that you're necessarily going to be able to determine what the "story" behind the name is. You can make a lot of speculation around 自来也 for instance, but it's doubtful that the average person is going to be able to determine what the origin of the name is merely by looking at the characters (and that's somewhat independent of their knowledge of kanji). It's unlikely that someone is going to arrive at (what I currently assume to be) the proper conclusion of "a 'calling card' phrase left by a thief in Chinese fiction meaning 'I was here'". On a side note, while you are correct that kanji names typically do not have "grammar" per se, in the case of 我来也 it is actually a sentence, which can be read in (classical) Japanese as われきたるなり, and it can assumably be read in Chinese as well.
    出産間近のうちの妻曰く「お産だけに、押さんといて!」
    そう。女性とは言えど見事に親父ギャグを発するのである。

  14. #27
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by Nihongaeri
    On a side note, while you are correct that kanji names typically do not have "grammar" per se, in the case of 我来也 it is actually a sentence, which can be read in (classical) Japanese as われきたるなり, and it can assumably be read in Chinese as well.
    See! You do know more about this! (hey, I said you knew more, not that you knew much .)

  15. #28
    Translator 上級員 / Jyoukuuin / Sr. Member Nihongaeri's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mang

    Quote Originally Posted by Iwanin
    See! You do know more about this! (hey, I said you knew more, not that you knew much .)
    Just a tad bit more I'm afraid...

    Anyhow, if it matters to anyone, note that the 也 in Jiraiya's name, when used in classical Japanese, is typically always read なり. And it's the same なり that you may have heard while studying Japanese in the idiom 時は金なり. In other words, 也 is effectively a classical form of だ.
    出産間近のうちの妻曰く「お産だけに、押さんといて!」
    そう。女性とは言えど見事に親父ギャグを発するのである。

  16. #29
    Translator 中級員 / Chuukyuuin / Member Rikki-Tikki-Tavi's Avatar
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    それにしても
    I'm not entirely convinced that "Naruto" doesn't have annother meaning, since it's a vaild name, it could also have a relation to some real-life person.
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  17. #30
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    Re: Translation of Japanese words frequently appearing in translated Naruto mangas

    Quote Originally Posted by Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    I'm not entirely convinced that "Naruto" doesn't have annother meaning, since it's a vaild name, it could also have a relation to some real-life person.
    First of all... no one would be named "Naruto" in real life. Because that is a ridiculous name.

    Second of all.. ;_; did you not read my response... eh?!

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