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Thread: scanlation process

  1. #1
    Registered User 初心者/ Shoshinsha / Beginner
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    scanlation process

    not sure if this is the place to look at, but can anyone tell me how a typical scan gets done?

    like the entire pipeline such as:
    where scans come from, where translators get their scans, what they do and how they submit their work... what typesetters/proofreaders would get and what they do...

    really want to be part of this process, but no idea where to start =(

    any advice too?

  2. #2
    Scanlator 中級員 / Chuukyuuin / Member fleshcut's Avatar
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    Re: scanlation process

    normally someone scans in the manga then the translator gets it and give the the translated script for the manga to a proofreader. When that's done someone cleans the raw in photoshop removing the japanese text then a typesetter types on the new translations and its done (most basic way of explaining the pipeline)

    apply to join a group most are willing to train you have to do one or more of the jobs - aside from translating

    manga helpers haves a staff recruitment section just find a group you like and apply

    always looking for people to help

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  4. #3
    Intl Translator 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member Ju-da-su's Avatar
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    Re: scanlation process

    Normally, raws come from 1) a public source, like some places where the raws are posted in public for anyone to take them; or 2) a personal raw provider, someone in the group who's willing to buy the mangas and scan specifically for a certain scanlation group. Once the raw is out, the translator grabs it to translate it, either for the public or for a certain group, while the cleaner grabs it to clean everything, make the scan looks nice and clean and eliminating all the texts he or she has to eliminate for their group (while public cleaner does existed, most cleaners only work for specific group...in fact, I only knows 1 cleaner who's a public cleaner so far...>_>"). Once both of those are done, the translation and the cleaned scans are sent to the typesetter, for the typesetter to put the translation into the scans. Once the typesetter is done, you get a finished scanlation. .-.

    Some scanlation groups can also have people who are quality checkers, like proofreaders (the one who basically look through the translated script and correct the script to make it sounds like English or whatever language it's supposed to be, correcting up spelling and grammatical mistakes), translation checker (the proofreader of "accuracy") and QCer (person who look through the finished scanlation to ensure that everything is nicely done and of top quality possible, mostly in term of cleans and typesets).

    Anyone can submit their work anywhere, really. It can be on a personal website (like group site) or on public community (like here). For the finished scanlation, mostly the scanlator will post it up on their websites. For the works under process (like raw, translation and cleaned scan), it depends on the person. As for HOW they submit it...depends on where it is. If it's the works under process for specific scanlation group, mostly, it'll be on the wire behind the scene (like PMs between staff members, hidden forum, and such). If it's not for any specific group, like in case of public raw and translations, it can be anywhere...just somewhere accessible. ._."

    I don't totally understand what you want to know about "what typesetter and proofreader get" though. Most of the scanlators don't get anything for what they do, while some do through donation and specific requests of the scanlator (mostly the raw providers and the translator...meaning, some scanlators do pay for the raw provider and the translator to work for them) Mostly, proofreader and typesetter won't really get anything special, other than opportunity of being able to "read" the manga before anyone (if the raws and/or the translations are on private, only being given behind the scene within a particular scanlation group to staff members who're part of the process, proofreaders and typesetters included)...don't know if that answer you question or not though...>_>"

    It isn't all that hard to get your standing point on where to start though. Take a look at what resources do you have? Do you have any nearby Japanese bookstores where you can buy some manga? (I know you have. One of my friends who's a raw provider is a Singaporian, and she scans whole bunch of raws every week...-.-") Do you have a scanner? Can you afford the scanner if you don't have one already? (since even if you can't afford the manga, some group will pay for you to buy the manga, so that you can scan for them) Do you know Japanese? (Though if you're answer is no...I won't advise you to start at the t/ler or t/cer if you want to be part of the process ASAP. Learning the language enough to be able to translate or check other people's work does take a hell lot more effort and time than learning how to clean or typeset properly...well, redrawer excluded, maybe...since that job is also as hard as hell...beginner cleaner won't be require to work that out, as even some of the cleaners who has been in the process for years can't do it...-.-") Do you have photoshop? Do you know how to rotate, level, and stuff in it? How's your English proficiency? I'd say, start from looking at yourself and see what you have is the most important thing, if you want to start being part of the line. Everything else, like how things are to be done, will be provided by the group or even anywhere online for you once you know what you want to do (since most groups and people in the process are willing to teach you how things are done and where you can find other stuffs to add on to your work...things like raws, translations, photoshop techniques, manga fonts, etc... )

    Try going to the recruitment forums here and see which groups are looking for more staffs (and see if they're willing to train newbies or not). Try going to the site of the group that scans your favorite mangas and try to see if they're recruiting or not. Most of the adept groups will be willing to train newbies and give advices to you on how things are supposed to be done. Good luck with it...>_<"

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  6. #4
    in absentia 有名人 / Yuumeijin / Celebrity saladesu's Avatar
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    Re: scanlation process

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju-da-su View Post
    .... Do you have any nearby Japanese bookstores where you can buy some manga? (I know you have. One of my friends who's a raw provider is a Singaporian, and she scans whole bunch of raws every week...-.-")...
    Now I realize I'm from the same little country as you, yesterdaze

    If you'd like to be a raw provider, the Japanese bookstore you should look out for is Kinokuniya, specifically the one in Liang Court (the Ngee Ann City one has Japanese books, yes, but not really manga magazines). From what I understand though, you might need to subscribe to the magazine weekly/monthly to get a copy, though. Scanning is no easy process, though...

    The simplest way to actually get into the scanlation process would probably be proofreading, though. If your English is good, then you can simply read translated scripts by translators whose English may not be that good, and correct any grammar mistakes or make the dialogue sound more vernacular.

  7. #5
    Intl Translator 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member Ju-da-su's Avatar
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    Re: scanlation process

    Quote Originally Posted by saladesu View Post
    Now I realize I'm from the same little country as you, yesterdaze

    If you'd like to be a raw provider, the Japanese bookstore you should look out for is Kinokuniya, specifically the one in Liang Court (the Ngee Ann City one has Japanese books, yes, but not really manga magazines). From what I understand though, you might need to subscribe to the magazine weekly/monthly to get a copy, though. Scanning is no easy process, though...

    The simplest way to actually get into the scanlation process would probably be proofreading, though. If your English is good, then you can simply read translated scripts by translators whose English may not be that good, and correct any grammar mistakes or make the dialogue sound more vernacular.
    ...I kinda recall Rena telling me that both Kino branches in Singapore do have manga magazines though...But again, I'm not totally sure, since I can't remember everything she said...and yeah, am not a Singaporian... ._."

    Also, all of the job in the scanlating process can be easy, IMO...doing them properly is what makes them hard...

    You can ask Rena if you want to try out to become a raw provider...about how to make a good raw as well as about your Kino branches. Just ask her nicely, and she won't bite you. (She only bites if you pissed her off... :O )
    Last edited by Ju-da-su; January 27, 2011 at 09:01 AM.

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