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Thread: Yagi's source of inspiration

  1. #31
    Registered User 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member Brother Coa's Avatar
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    Re: Influences on Claymore

    This was already discussed here, not related to Claymore itself but instead to it's creator. Witch in the end is the same thing.

    While I agree that Claymore draw some influence from Dune my opinion is that they draw more influence from Warhammer 40.000 than Dune. In fact, they have their counterparts in Warhammer 40.000 - the Grey Knights. Everything is essentially the same, the only difference is that Grey Knights are all males ( opposite of Claymores ) and they wear armor that can survive nuclear explosion.
    Even when I look into the Organization they remind me of Inquisition from Warhammer 40.000.
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    MH Senpai 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member Ancy's Avatar
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    Re: Yagi's source of inspiration

    FIY I've merged the Influences on Claymore thread with Yagi's sources of inspiration thread. Hence here we can discuss all factors impacting Claymore. - Ancy

    I assume that Yagi also used folklore as one of its sources of inspiration. Claymores, awakened and yomas often remind me of some sort of shapeshifters...As you probably know,there are various mythological shapeshifters. However, the one that really stands out when it comes to similarities to Claymore is Kitsune, the Japanese spirit fox.

    Basically Kitsune can:
    - possess humans. However, it prefers women => in Claymore, this can be seen as infection.
    - can make a local distortion in space time => applicable when it comes to the age issue of the Warriors. After reaching adulthood, they stop ageing
    - has slit pupils as cats and foxes => Claymores also have a cat/ fox eye shape when releasing yoma power
    - anthropomorphic powers => awakening
    - Kitsune are often divided into Inari kitsune (also called myobu) and nogitsune. Myobu are often portrayed as good and nogitsune as potentially evil agents. => in Claymore, they can easily be described as Warriors and Awakened.
    - feeds on life force

    (Source: wikipedia)

    The myth of kitsune can be traced in China, Korea and India. I've recently seen a Chinese film called Painted skin. It presents the story of Xiaowei (chinese fox spirit) who embarks on a quest to free itself from an icy prison. The depiction of Xiaowei in this movie makes me think of Claymore.

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    Last edited by Ancy; November 14, 2012 at 06:52 PM.
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  4. #33
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    Re: Yagi's source of inspiration

    I got one thing that I've been pondering on.

    A lot of the examples people have brought up in this thread are all examples that take place in worlds which are sprawling with different houses, cultures, races and whatnot which all shape and affect their respective universes in different manners. On the contrary, the world (or worldbuilding if you will) of Claymore on which the story focuses on, the island, appears much more simplistic as Yagi has depicted it. I would say that this still is the case since we have so little knowledge of the mainland and might never become more familiar with it.

    I actually have a hard time coming up with another fantasy world that keeps it as relatively "clean" as Claymore have done from which is something that I guess at least partially depends on the length of the opus and, of course, the authors ambitions. Anyone else feel the same way or am I being mistaken?

    I can see how you could argue for the contrary but it's just the overall feel that I've got which I'm trying to state.


    Also, the other week I was in Paris so now I have been able to visit all of the museums of which there are handlers named after (the Louvre, Orsay, Hermitage and finally the Prado. So yay for that
    Last edited by Mucha; November 14, 2012 at 08:08 PM. Reason: Typo

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  6. #34
    MH Senpai 英雄メンバー / Eiyuu Menbaa / Hero Member Ancy's Avatar
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    Re: Yagi's source of inspiration

    Mucha...when you said the story is "clean", did you imply that Yagi's is not using any sources of inspiration?
    If so, on which grounds are you basing your theory, other than the "simplistic depiction of the Claymore Island" (which is a rather vague statement, in my opinion)?
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    Re: Yagi's source of inspiration

    Quote Originally Posted by Ancy View Post
    Mucha...when you said the story is "clean", did you imply that Yagi's is not using any sources of inspiration?
    If so, on which grounds are you basing your theory, other than the "simplistic depiction of the Claymore Island" (which is a rather vague statement, in my opinion)?

    No, let me try to clarify:

    You know how some authors and mangakas go very far lengths in meticulously creating a complex world/universe in which their stories take place? And I do think Dune is a good example among others who take place in a fantasy or science fiction settings.

    By "clean" I meant that the opposite rings much truer regarding Claymore. In other words; Claymore focuses a lot more on characters and events rather than trying to conjure up this world and describe its institutions, history and so forth. Of course it has some as is more or less mandatory when you don't let your stories take place in the real world.

    However, it still does so only to a relatively low extent which I find somewhat rare, especially considering the genre. And that's why I personally have a hard time coming up with an example of a work which has a similar feel to it.

    I'm not suggesting that Yagi isn't using sources of inspiration, merely that in regards to the above stated I can't find a good example of a source of inspiration (of which I'm sure there are many) in this matter.

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    Registered User 上級員 / Jyoukuuin / Sr. Member faintsmile1992's Avatar
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    Re: Yagi's source of inspiration

    Mucha is saying that Claymore is in the subgenre of 'low fantasy'.

    If you look at their island, although it isn't a real world location, most of it looks very much like Renaissance Italy without gunpowder weapons. Though the east looks Cappadocian to me.

    As for folklore I was wondering if Yagi was influenced by (traditonal) windigo tales from North America but folkloric themes could be indirect through fantasy. If you look at The Witcher it has a lot of Slavic folklore in it so both Witchers and Claymores are influenced by the traditional Slavic dhampir, the half-vampire who has superior powers in excess of a full vampire's and hunts the full blooded vampires as a vocation and nomadic lifestyle. (And people who like fantasy tend also to like folktales but I think the supposed similarity of Claymore to those kitsune traditions suggested by Ancy is stretching it though IMO.)

    It could be that the similarity to the Grettisaga is through Nietzsche (Grettisaga is thought to have influenced Nietzsche), but there's still a lot of similarity between the Icelandic culture and Claymore - berserks were seen to overflow and become a kind of monster to be hunted and killed. In Anglo-Saxon literature, similar themes permeates Beowulf - Grendel is a wreccan, and Beowulf the stranger from outside is feared lest he also become a wreccan.

    I don't know whether similar themes exist in traditional Japanese folklore, but if they do they're pre-Buddhist. Maybe all martial cultures possess such a concept but the Germanic traditions are most vivid and explicit about the idea of warriors overflowing, obtaining monsterhood, and being hunted down as targets by warriors who in turn are feared to awaken and can expect to be marked for death in the same way.

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